The first person to refer to the therapeutic applications of art as art therapy was artist Adrian Hill. While being treated in a sanatorium for tuberculosis, he suggested participating in art projects to his fellow patients. This was the beginning for him and he discussed much of this work as an art therapist in his book, “Art Versus Illness.” Hill’s work was expanded upon by the artist Edward Adamson. He worked with Hill to introduce this new therapy to long-term British patients in mental hospitals. He continued establishing programs in facilities until he retired from the industry in 1981. Adamson opened a studio where patients could freely create art without comment or judgement from others. He was a proponent of non-interventional art therapy where patients simply create art for self-expression rather than for psychological interpretation by a clinician.

It’s the mission of Veterans and Hearts to continue this practice to enrich the lives of our military veterans living with post-traumatic stress disorder and other parallel conditions.

A Healing Process

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Our country's heroes place themselves in life and death situations to preserve our freedoms. Veterans and Hearts goal is to start the healing process through art. Collectively we can assist in the transition of Military Veterans back into the community successfully. One stroke of a paint brush, or one note of an instrument at a time.

According to the American Art Therapy Association (AATA), art therapy is the use of art creation as a form of psychotherapy for people experiencing trauma or illness, seeking personal development, or struggling to deal with the day-to-day act of living. Through the act of creating art and thinking about the process and medium, people are able to develop skills that increase cognitive ability, increase awareness of self and others, and help them cope with the distressing symptoms of limitations imposed by disability or disease. The primary purpose of art therapy is to help patients heal their mental and emotional wounds as much as they can.

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Winston Churchhill

Winston Churchill named his manic depression the “Black Dog.” Nevertheless, through art he found peace within himself and the world around.

Learn More About Winston Churchill